2 Thessalonians 3:13

READ:

2 Thessalonians 3:13

13 But ye, brethren, be not weary in well doing.

EXHORTATION:

As much as this exhortation is a warning to Christians against becoming weary in well doing, it is also an encouragement to continue in their commitment to be charitable and helpful to others in need. Throughout the New Testament, Christians are urged to be welldoers. Jesus exhorted His followers in Matthew 5:16, “Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.” Likewise in Titus 3:8, we are instructed by Paul “that they which have believed in God might be careful to maintain good works.

The apostle Paul reminds us in Ephesians 2:10, “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.” So, how do we know what are the good works that God wants us to fulfil? 2 Timothy 3:16-17 teaches us that “All scripture is given … that the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.” In pursuing well doing, we are obeying the will of God revealed in the Bible.

Even among those who oppose us, we are commanded to show our good works. We read in 1 Peter 2:12, “Having your conversation honest among the Gentiles: that, whereas they speak against you as evildoers, they may by your good works, which they shall behold, glorify God in the day of visitation.” In 1 Timothy 2:9-10, Christian women are told that what is proper for godly women is not so much “broided hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly array” as “good works”. In 1 Timothy 6:18, rich Christians are admonished to be mindful “that they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate”. Though widows are often needy people, they too are encouraged to be engaged in well doing, so that they may be found worthy to be in the list of women who can be entrusted with responsibilities in the church. In 1 Timothy 5:10, Paul advised that such a widow should be “well reported of for good works; if she have brought up children, if she have lodged strangers, if she have washed the saints’ feet, if she have relieved the afflicted, if she have diligently followed every good work.

Quite often, we may be disappointed and even discouraged by the ungratefulness and abusive reaction of the recipients of our kindness. However, we should not allow our hearts to grow weary in well doing.

 

Rev (Dr) Prabhudas Koshy, 15 September, 2018